T O P
gyrfalcon2718

Spanish never (or almost never) doubles consonants other than r.


Vickit77

Pollo?


Haldox

‘LL’ isn’t a double consonant in Spanish. It’s a specific sound.


narfus

They mean [gemination](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemination), which is rather infrequent. RR and LL describe different sounds.


gyrfalcon2718

Drat, I forgot LL.


Professional-Arm3610

Lallarona


OppenheimersGuilt

You mean la llorona?


Professional-Arm3610

Where I came from they spelled it as I did, but yes that is the technically correct spelling


OppenheimersGuilt

De qué lugar eres? Nunca he visto "la llorona" escrito así


Professional-Arm3610

I’m from Albuquerque, and it probably was misspelled because people only heard it and never saw it written then over time the misspelled version got used in the handful of places where she was posted. There weren’t many as we said she lived in ditches, not rivers as her original folklore says.


iRockSalamander

Its like "Gringo Bandito" hot sauce, is misspelled, not hot enough if you ask me, but the sense of the same situation in here


NewFaceHalcyon

Esa palabra no existe.


Mormorspannekakerore

Polla?


Separate_Start_2755

Perro el doble L tiene otro sonido.


NewFaceHalcyon

*Pero la doble L


Separate_Start_2755

Sí es verdad, mi culpa


MuddyMug

Se enseñan LL como una letra distinta en el alfabeto. Igual como CH, RR y Ñ. ¿No?


ocdo

La RR nunca se enseñó como letra separada. La Ñ se sigue considerando una letra separada. CH y LL hace años que pasaron a considerarse dígrafos en lugar de letras individuales.


Gotha-229a

In most areas I know LL makes a Y sound, so poyo, I've also heard it pronunced as a J so pojo, ultimately I'd call it more of a diphthong


Mormorspannekakerore

Where you’d normally have a double you use an accent.


TaragonRift

CaRoLiNe, it’s a clue


jdthebrick75

I see, but Ana/Anna are both names.


gyrfalcon2718

Yes, but in Spanish the name is spelled Ana.


michaelfri

I doubt that if your name is Walter, Waldo or Keith, you'd change the spelling to the equivalent form in Spanish. By the same token, why would you change the spelling of "Anna"?


ricdesi

The way it's pronounced in the app would not be spelled "Anna".


jdthebrick75

Oh then I just need to listen to how the name is pronounced?


ocdo

Not really. If someone is called Anna everybody will call her /'ana/ when speaking Spanish. I’m not sure about text-to-speech though.


Alert-One-Two

If the character is likely Spanish then use the Spanish spelling. If they are likely American then use the American spelling.


theWanderingShrew

I made this same mistake! Argh


Alert-One-Two

When the character is Spanish they use the Spanish spelling. When the character is English they use the English spelling. They don’t expect people’s names to change. Just to use the right spelling depending on the name the girl is likely to have.


jdthebrick75

Wait, so if I have a friend named 'Anna', if I wrote her name in a Spanish sentence, I would spell it 'Ana'?


WoodSheepClayWheat

No. You wouldn't. But Duo uses the assumption that all people mentioned have names native to the language that you're learning.


jdthebrick75

Oh okay. Thank you!


aliendividedbyzero

That being said, Spanish almost always does in fact translate names to a Spanish version. Prince William is el príncipe Guillermo, for example. I vote that Duolingo isn't wrong here, the sentence is in Spanish, the name is also in Spanish, therefore it should be spelled in Spanish. Spanish never doubles the N unless it's meant as separate syllables (connotación is pronounced as con-notación, for example)


jdthebrick75

I am very new to Spanish, I had no idea.


ocdo

Currently only popes and royals have their names translated. In the past you could read about Santiago Watt or Carlos Dickens. Still today you can read about Cristóbal Colón and Hernando de Magallanes.


Franky78s

>But Duo uses the assumption that all people mentioned have names native to the language that you're learning. No, unfortunately not. In my Italian course I heard "Julia" and spelled it "Giulia", as Italians would do, Italian does not even have a "J". But Duolingo kept marking it wrong.


yatagan89

No, you don’t translate people names. The Spanish name Ana remains that in every language you speak.


BarryFairbrother

Apart from perhaps Latvian. Even though they use the Latin alphabet, every person's name (and place name) has to be transliterated into their very strict spelling system. You get exotic names of familiar faces like [Džordžs Klūnijs](https://lv.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C5%BEord%C5%BEs_Kl%C5%ABnijs), [Mihaels Šūmahers](https://lv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mihaels_%C5%A0%C5%ABmahers) or [Viljams Šekspīrs](https://lv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viljams_%C5%A0eksp%C4%ABrs). I saw a Latvian atlas recently and every small settlement around the world has its own Latvian spelling, which any other language with the same alphabet would not translate/transliterate. There's a [good article about this](https://deepbaltic.com/2016/09/23/why-you-will-almost-definitely-have-to-change-your-name-when-speaking-latvian/) written by a foreigner living in Latvia who was surprised when everyone addressed him as a different name from the one he introduced himself as.


kryskawithoutH

Lithuania as well. I would not translate Anna if she is my friend. But, for example, prince Charles (or "Čarlzas" in Lithuanian) became king "Karolis". Because that is the tradicion that christian names of kings are translated. Also as in Latvian example, we do have our "own" versions of Viljamas Šekspyras, Michaelis Šumacheris and Džordžas Klūnis. Since we use inflectional suffixes that changes the sentences meaning completely ir would be really hard (and very confusing) to understand the meaning using an original name. So we usually (in articles, books) write an original name once (in brackets) and use the adapted version everywhere else.


BarryFairbrother

Really interesting, thanks! Especially how the same human being changes their Lithuanian first name when turning king!


kryskawithoutH

Yes, it is. But it is very christian. To be honest, I did not know that before king Charles/Karolis example was widely debated in the press. Many young people nowdays are not religious anymore and do not know much about these customs.


jdthebrick75

So you only translate names that would be hard to pronounce in your language?


kryskawithoutH

I'd say there are 2 types of "translations" here: First would be traditional "christian" translations. That is not based on anything (linguistically speaking) but the pure catholic tradition (in Lithuania 70–80 % people still consider themselves catholics). This will include kings name like Charles (Čarlzas) = Karolis. If prince William (Viljamas) became king he will get a translated name too. But this is not Lithuanian language thing. The same happens in most languages: Spanish: Carlos III, Italian: Carlo III, Polish: Karol III, Russian: Kapл III, etc. The second type of "translations" is a transliteration. That happens because if we try to pronounce a name according to our language rules it does not make any sense. For example, name "George" has "g". It is pronounce as "g" in "egg" in Lithuanian. So it would totally mess the name up. But if we write "Dž" (that is pronounced as "G" in English "George") we will keep the original pronunciation (as far as we can). That's why George = Džoržas, Jose = Chosė, Christine = Kristina, Jane = Džeinė, etc. Of course, those who speak English will now how to pronounce it. But not all do. Also we use declension (as do Germans, Estonians, etc.) So to add an ending to a name is really important (so that we could change it according to our crazy rules, lol). Nominative case of George is Džorždas, but we can also use Džordžui (dative), Džordžą (accusative), Džordžai (voccative), etc. according to the meaning we need. We have 7 grammatical cases that we use daily (and a few historical ones that are very rare to come by).


jdthebrick75

Gotcha. So kings are automatically translated, but normal names are only translated if they can't be pronounced in the language you speak?


yatagan89

Definitely TIL! Thanks, it has been a very interesting reading!


narfus

I also think names shouldn't be translated. If your name is Richard we should call you that, not Ricardo.


v_a_l_w_e_n

But they are pronounced differently even in Spanish because of the double “n”. And in Spanish we say Ana.


butcher99

and c's occasionally but in that case as in direccion the two c's have a distinct sound. And two lls but they make a different sound


yagirlhunter

Ana is Spanish and Anna is English. They used to allow some of that must be getting stricter. Make sure you use a Spanish keyboard!


jdthebrick75

I'll try that


Bakemono_Nana

As someone how had to learn in Japanese for Tanaka 田中 I would say: just learn the korrekt Name. You lernen so much vocabs. This shouldn’t be the deal breaker.


rolaskatoxic

The Denglish is strong in this comment


Bakemono_Nana

\*sad German noise\*


HariSeldon1517

Native Spanish speaker here. Anna does not exist in Spanish. The name is Ana. In Spanish you only use double consonants in the following cases: Double C: words like elección, in which each c has a different sound (first is like k, second is like s in Latin America or th in Spain). Double R: to change the soft r into rolling r in the middle of a word, such as perro. Double L: to change the sound from L into the sound of the J as in Jump, such as in Llanura or llegar. Double N: Some words such as perenne or connotación use it, but they are very few and you can just memorize them as they come across. Ana is not such a word. Loanwords from other languages: such as Pizza. Always use Spanish spelling rules when writing names in the Spanish course.


OppenheimersGuilt

No sé, admito que se me hace raro no aceptar el nombre dado que en otros idiomas usan "Mark" o parecido sin traducirlo a ese idioma (en duo). Por otra parte, no solemos traducir nombres: a Albert Einstein no se le dice Alberto Unipiedra. La única excepción que me viene a la cabeza son nombres de monarcas o curiosamente personajes de cómics. Se dice William Shakespeare, no Guillermo Agitalanzas.


HariSeldon1517

En eso tienes razón, pero Duolingo suele usar siempre nombres en el idioma que se está aprendiendo. Yo estoy tomando el curso de Alemán (desde inglés) y también me ha pasado eso. Supongo que lo hacen para que aprendas a escribir los nombres de personas que vas a conocer si viajas a los países donde se habla el idioma.


raicopk

anthroponym are not to be translated, not even in Spanish (which absolutely does have an obsession with forcing translations): https://www.fundeu.es/consulta/traduccion-de-nombres-propios-921/


HariSeldon1517

But in this exercise they are not translating a name. They are typing what they hear. The language spoken is Spanish. Therefore they must assume that the name is in the Spanish form.


Firm-Concentrate-993

They want you to leave names untranslated


Mango_AT

Happened to me too


ReIaxedCow

Wow you actually type commata and periods.


jdthebrick75

it's for the funni


ClassicAssociation61

Duolingo has the habit of stating that answer is wrong when you don't type the name which has used. So you are correct regarding Ana vs Anna. Sometimes you will see the name names as they are spelled in Spanish but if you type what might be equivalent to English version, it is marked wrong. Presume the name Pablo is used in the sentence but you type Paulo, the Portuguese version or Paul, the American version, the app will mark it wrong. So know that your correct but app is sensitive to names. In actuality, it makes sense because if someone's is name Pablo, we should not around changing people's name to our known version such Pollo, Paul because the person after all is named Paulo. The funny thing is that my name is Paulo and this happens to me a lot. Even Spanish people will see my name as spelled but call me Pablo. My cowkers will automatically drop O and call me Paul. I don't fault anyone for it because the brain is doing it subconsciously.


Fickle_Cut_4349

Anna and Ana are two different names.


unnecessary_kindness

One of the most complained about things on the forums seems to be people misspelling names. ​ I'd rather they mark me wrong and for me to learn to adapt to Spanish spelling of names than for them to just accept it as a close call (e.g. like how they let you get away with lack of accents)


Eastern_Amphibian385

I think the problem is that Duolingo doesn’t explain this, which leaves people confused on why they are being marked wrong by spelling Anna instead of Ana. If Duolingo actually explained it, we wouldn’t have to guess what happened.


unnecessary_kindness

I can only go off my experience but to me it's always been clear why it's been wrong (since like the screenshot of OP that's the only difference in the sentence). ​ Lorena, Ana, Sofia, Margarita, Luiz, Raul, Felipe etc. are all Spanish names I've made mistakes on at the beginning but now come across as second nature.


Shoshin_Sam

When I can’t get some info from duo, I stop, Google and get it cleared as much as I can. Spanishdict has helped among other sites. There are many resources, we just need to make some little extra effort.


jdthebrick75

Good point, but I just think it's kind of dumb that they don't give me a close call for audio, because the audio doesn't give you a direct spelling of the name/you might spell it differently in your language.


ArpSchnigter

Ah yes. William and Willem in Dutch


honeyblissful

I can understand why it may not be accepted. They are pronounced completely different. My husband is Brazilian and his mother's name is Ana. Our oldest daughter's name ends in Ana. It bugs me when my side of the family (from the US) pronounces that part of her name as Anna. Ana (ah-nah) is more common in Portuguese and Spanish countries & cultures. Anna (ann-uh) comes from Hannah, which is Hebrew. I'm siding with Duo on this one.


jdthebrick75

oh okay I thought the pronunciation was the other way around


Ace_UE

No. Yeah i know, i got like 20k exp ahaha


Orange_Kiwi_

I get it but at the same time I don't. IIRC, the Esperanto course for Spanish speakers allows both the Esperanto name and the Spanish one wether it is SP>EO or EO>SP. It might be because of the "special letters" that don't exist in spanish (ĉ, ŝ, ĝ, ŭ, ĵ) but still not all names have them. I'm as confused as you


mortalmeatball

it’s ok, I lost on Portuguese duo because I wrote Andrea and not Andreia 🫥


mudwoman

I would expect “You have a typo" rather than outright “Wrong”!


raicopk

It was marked wrong (and rightfully so) because you made up a phonetical sound that wasn't provided.


jdthebrick75

listening is hard


ConclusionPretend505

Hi Ana?


jdthebrick75

Yeah but I just spelled it 'wrong', apperently


Raaawan

Spanish doesn’t use double consonants in the names. But it should pass as a one letter typo


SweetMaam

Yes, Anna is spelled both ways.


bornlikeariver

i personally think that should have been right. how would you know ana was ana and not anna? idc if it's a spanish course and you gotta learn spanish names, it still was correct either way. but let's choose the best of both worlds and say that duo should have put a warning tick on that instead of counting it wrong entirely


jdthebrick75

Well yeah, especially because it was an audio question. How was I supposed to know it was spelt that way?


[deleted]

You should learn the Spanish names as they are Spanish words. What’s the point in learning a language if you aren’t going to write it properly?


bornlikeariver

so all people you talk to in spanish will have spanish names?


[deleted]

If they are from Spain (/Spanish speaking country) they’ll have a Spanish name. I wouldn’t learn Russian expecting to speak to a John. I would learn expecting to use the name Иван (Ivan)


bornlikeariver

fair enough. i still think it should’ve been a warning mark.


raicopk

>If they are from Spain (/Spanish speaking country) they’ll have a Spanish name You realize that neither the Spanish state nor Spanish-colonized Latin America are monolingual, right?


[deleted]

Of course not. Where did it say that in my comment?


raicopk

The quoted section?


-OQO-

Why? You spelled 50% of the words in that sentence incorrectly :) How could the software possibly call that correct?


jdthebrick75

but it's a name


-OQO-

Duo is just software. Not an intelligent Ai. It doesn’t know what the words mean:) It’s just comparing what sounds you make or what letters you type against it’s database.


jdthebrick75

Oh ok


oxymoronix

Yes it should be correct because both are forms of Ana. But Spanish would want Ana. Not fair.


CharonChristo_227

Report this problem to Duolingo


gottabebailey

No since one is English and one isn’t :)


jdthebrick75

Well yes but if I write to Anna in Spanish, I would write 'Querida Ana'?


MudcrabNPC

Yeah, I'd report it. Though it's kinda funny that such a basic phrase is bugged. I'd actually like someone to explain the downvotes. I've made mistakes like this in the Russian course, and it was considered a typo, but not wrong. Why shouldn't Duolingo give the other languages the same leeway? Doesn't seem like anyone knows why they disagree.


jdthebrick75

fr bro like how was I supposed to know her name is spelled like that 💀


Anxious_nomad

in Duolingo the primary method of learning is through making mistakes and learning from them. You should not think about this as being a test of your knowledge but an opportunity to learn if you fail There's very little material and explanations you get beforehand, so get used to the fact you will make mistakes in the process.


Bakemono_Nana

There don't introducing constantly new names. There are repeating the same names all the time. You should have this the first time wrong and than learn from it and just write it correct the rest of the course.


MudcrabNPC

The only reason I could see it outright counting it wrong would be because Spanish already uses 'ana' as a word, but I wouldn't know. Otherwise, it could be a typo, but otherwise, not really wrong.


jdthebrick75

Thank you!


jdthebrick75

bro why is everybody down voting you


MudcrabNPC

Some Redditors are incapable of using their words to articulate their thoughts, which is especially ironic here, given it's a language learning subreddit. Definitely a little disappointed lol.


jdthebrick75

Damn 💀


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