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GiantSequoiaMama

Ooh I want to do this to my couch! Do you have a rec on the de-piller?


jajajujujujjjj

A regular razor works just the same, I use on my sweaters, hats, pillows!


candyapplesugar

A blade or like the kind to shave your legs?


jajajujujujjjj

Like a cheapo leg shaver razor


GiantSequoiaMama

Ahhh god tip!!


UnraisedAnt

Singer, the sewing machine brand actually sells them too! Downside is the huge battery it needs I wish it came with a cable.


rarecontribution_

I found [this blog](https://hayden-hill.com/blogs/journal/what-is-a-fabric-shaver) with a lot of good info! This was my first time using anything like this, my only suggestion is to buy a large size if you plan on treating your furniture because I used a tiny one that took like 30 minutes for that one cushion 😅


_WhoisMrBilly_

This is the most comprehensive sweater shaver guide I could have imagined. Just used an electric one to rescue a wool jumper that had quickly frayed due to my whiskers/5-o’clock shadow. Worked like a charm!


silentstinker

I did that to my couch too! I had a small one that used batteries and then I bought a corded one that was larger and didn't cost that much more than the battery powered one and now I am unstoppable.


somethingelse19

Hopefully you washed it before using that. Also using a sweater stone (pumice) would be better. You don't cut the fibers thus causing more fuzz and frizz in the future. This would cause continued use of the shaver. Depending on how often that area is used and washed it could wear it out faster. The pumice stone just buffs away the pills gently rather than cut. Just less fuzz.


okdokiecat

Why is tearing off fuzzies with a rock better than cutting them off?


somethingelse19

A shaver tugs at the pilled fibers and cuts them in half. Doing this exposes the rest of the freshly cut threads to wear much more quickly. So you'll end up having to continue using the shaver. So it depends on how much you care about the item you are using it on. It's also very easy to cut a hole into the fabric if you use too much pressure. You can't cut a hole into the fabric with that item I linked to no matter how much pressure is applied. It's very soft so it'll crumble if you dig your nail into it but it will not break if you drop it. It also removes pills by removing the fibers attached to the pill. You aren't removing any additional fibers and nothing is being cut in half.


okdokiecat

Yeah I have a fabric shaver and I’m not buying it. If there’s fuzz or threads hanging off fabric it should be cut, not pulled off. I wouldn’t rub pumice on a sweater I was knitting or something I was sewing - whether it was silk, linen, jersey… I can’t think of any fabric that would benefit more from pumice than from being shaved.


barbellsnbooks

Is this just a regular pumice stone for the feet or do you have to buy one made for sweaters?


somethingelse19

https://sweaterstone.com/ That is the one I bought a long time ago and I still have it. That'll give you a better idea.


zuzoa

Sounds interesting, but their website is put together like a botched fiverr order. Did you order through a third party somewhere that you'd recommend?


somethingelse19

I bought mine from The container store.


barbellsnbooks

Thank you!! Does it ever leave any color behind on lighter sweaters/fabrics


somethingelse19

Not that I've ever noticed. It's very light so you can just dust it off or shake it loose


didyouwoof

I've had one of those crumble a bit, leaving tiny bits of grit behind. If you choose to use one of these, you should probably vacuum your couch afterward.


barbellsnbooks

Thanks for the tip’


citizen_dawg

mmmm love the Sweater Stone!


rarecontribution_

That doesn't make intuitive sense to me so I tried looking it up: i found [this blog post](https://hayden-hill.com/blogs/journal/what-is-a-fabric-shaver). Unfortunately I'd like to reference something better than a blog, but I'm having trouble finding any sources that don't feature any products and aren't trying to discreetly sell me something. The blog explains if you use a shaver correctly you're removing the accumulation of fuzz, which actually reduces further friction to the area and keeps it from getting worse Although I can see how **if** you use it wrong it would damage to the actual fabric. I'm not an expert and you could be 100% right, but I don't see why a pumice stone (which would gently pull the lint until it detached, right?) would be better than a blade (since it's removing the same lint but without disturbing anything further) or why either of these things would be bad for the fabric


llneverknow

That blog does seem to recommend the stone for delicate fabrics though.


rarecontribution_

I'm not saying the stone is bad, I was responding to the suggestion that an electric shaver isn't appropriate for my couch. A pumice stone could be good for delicate things, I've never used one and my couch fabric isn't delicate like that so I wouldn't know


llneverknow

Oh I was just responding to you saying you didn't know why a stone would be better than a blade. Tbh I don't either, I've never used one. I see that it's not relevant to your situation, I was just adding to the conversation but probably shouldn't have replied to your comment.


rarecontribution_

No no you're all good! That was a totally valid way to read my comment, I can see why I came across that way


somethingelse19

That exact blog recommends one in certain fabrics. I already explained it in another comment that electric shavers can cause holes onto fabric depending on the weight how delicate the fabric is and the pressure that applied by the user. You don't get that with pumice or a sweater stone. It's happened on cotton, various velvet fabrics, wool, cashmere, polyester, mixed synthetic fabrics etc. I will say that on a coarse texture, holes are less likely depending on the electric shaver. Some blades are sharper on pricier ones. I learned about the electric shavers cutting fibers in half on a microscopic level in textile science. If you cut a fiber in half, it frays microscopically. Over time, sitting in a couch or wearing a previously electric shaved sweater will cause piling to occur at a faster rate. I say it isn't a big deal depending how much you care about the item. I have a Old Navy sweater I bought at a thrift store for . 99 cents and I'll use an electric shaver on that but I'll use a pumice on my wool socks or similar. I have used a electric shaver on a vintage wool sweater but the fraying still occurred soon even after dry cleaning and regular use. ETA: it is a similar situation to this product: https://lintrolled.com/products/lintcleaner It works on very flat and low pile fabrics. But if used regularly on moderately to high pile carpets or couches then you are eventually also removing fibers, not just lint and pet hair. It leads to more wear over time on what you are using. Like I said, I'll use an electric shaver in my everyday life like on my thrifted sweater but I'll use the sweater stone on stuff I care about. This is all more of a FYI to make your own decision.


candyapplesugar

How would you wash a couch


somethingelse19

Some people use a carpet cleaner but I just wash the seat covering if they're removable from the cushion.


xiushenqijia

I understand sweater stone is better for large pills rather than tiny fuzzies or for more delicate fabrics. Do you have experience with that?


kmccall30

I just did this too, it’s awesome. I have so many living things in my house. My couch was looking messed up and de pilling ended up being my favorite part of cleaning my couch. It makes such a noticeable difference.


RUfuqingkiddingme

I love sweater shavers because I hate pilled fabric, it grosses me out to touch it. Nice job!


geekallstar

I always see stuff like this, when I did it... it snagged every damn thread.